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More Xi’an Street Food in Winter

29/12/2012

Just as I promised, here are more shots of the street food vendors near my apartment here in Xi’an, China. I love interacting with the locals and trying my best to speak Chinese. Somehow despite my laughable language skills, the vendors seem to understand me well enough to take my order.

Steam pours off of the food cart as customers eagerly await their orders.

Steam pours off of the food cart as customers eagerly await their orders.

One of my favorite sandwiches comes from this woman's cart. It's a steamed bun folded over a fried egg, marinated chicken strips (also flash fried), a spicy sauce, and lettuce. The woman who owns the cart knows me but was still a little camera shy in this photo.

One of my favorite sandwiches comes from this woman’s cart. It’s a steamed bun folded over a fried egg, marinated chicken strips (also flash fried), a spicy sauce, and lettuce.
The woman who owns the cart knows me but was still a little camera shy in this photo.

More steaming goodness...

More steaming goodness…

I'll try this veggie and skewered meat stand next time.

I’ll try this veggie and skewered meat stand next time.

I go to this stand fairly often. They make fresh veggie (think pesto) stuffed dumplings right on the spot, them boil them immediately after they are hand formed.

I go to this stand fairly often. They make fresh veggie (think pesto) stuffed dumplings right on the spot, then boil them immediately after they are hand formed.

Here the guy doing the cooking (the son in the family, I believe) drops my order of 30 dumplings into boiling water.

Here the guy doing the cooking (the son in the family, I believe) drops my order of 30 dumplings into boiling water.

My 30 fat little dumplings are happily cooking away.

My 30 fat little dumplings are happily cooking away.

My dumplings come out of the water and into a bowl... Next they are covered by some spicy broth.One of the first phrases I learned in Chinese is "Wǒ bù yào wèijīng.", which means, "I don't want any MSG." That's an important phrase to know or your food is often doused in the "stuff".

My dumplings come out of the water and into a bowl… Next they are covered by some spicy broth.
One of the first phrases I learned in Chinese was “Wǒ bù yào wèijīng.”, which means, “I don’t want any MSG.” That’s an important phrase to know or your food is often doused in the “stuff”.

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And here you have it! The dumpling stand was only a 3 or 4 minute walk back to my flat where jumped into my little treasures.Actually, there were too many to eat all at one sitting, so I saved some for lunch the next day. The wine is a Chinese Cabernet… Not outstanding but palatable.Total cost for the meal? Only US$1.44 for the dumplings and US$4.50 for the wine. 

In case you are wondering, no… the “Americanized” Chinese food you get in the US or Europe is nothing like authentic food here. I’ll miss this when I eventually leave China.

Until next time!

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7 Comments
  1. Sue permalink

    wow! im drooling right now of this foods 🙂 looks sooo yyummmy!

  2. Thanks Sue… Yes, the food here is amazing. The nice thing is you don’t have to go to any particular area of Xi’an to get the street food… It’s everywhere (including right outside my door.) 🙂

  3. Sue permalink

    you are a lucky guy! how i wish we have that here in Germany 😦

    • Yes, the street food certainly represents the best Chinese cities have to offer. Unfortunately it’s almost impossible to find real German bread here. Until recently I was able to buy real unsliced loaves of German bread at the German owned “Metro” store here in Xi’an. Much to my chagrin, they quite carrying it, a couple of weeks ago. They switched to bagged and sliced “German bread”. It’s quite funny to hear the Chinese workers trying to tell me “it’s the same thing”. I don’t think they understand the concept of, “NOT!”.

      While DE rarely has this street food, it does often have all of those yummy Imbiss stands. I really love being in Berlin where I eine Bockwurst und Brochen für nur 1 € kaufen kaufen kann… und auch ein Bier für nur 1 €. While common in Germany, few U.S. cities (with the exception of those with large ethnic populations) have these Imbiss stands.

      I also love the small little “Tante Emma” beer gardens like this one called “Ela’s Biergarten” in Berlin’s Köpenick area (near the Müggelsee):
      https://coolblueice.wordpress.com/2011/05/23/weekend-bike-rides/

      Thanks for your comments, Sue!

  4. Sue permalink

    im the one who is thankful because i can get tip of your trips which is very informative 🙂 yeah, everytime a friend visit me in Germany i always bring them im imbiss where we can eat currywurst mit pommes or brötchen. 🙂 very deliscious and affordable price.have you tried schweinehaxe? its deliscious partener for beer, Prost! ahhahhahahha! German bread is the best!

    • Hi Sue. No, I’ve not tried Schweinehaxe yet, but based on your suggestion, I’ll try it next trip.

      Oh… I like Currywurst as well. It’s one of the few dishes for which Berlin can claim as its own. I sometimes laugh that Germany has a museum for everything, including the Currywurst Museum in Berlin. Just for fun, I’ll check it out next time I’m there.

      Thanks for your comments!

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